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Musee du Louvre, Paris

Musee du Louvre, Paris
Musee du Louvre, Paris

Musee du Louvre, Paris, Of course, there are museums all over the city but if you are going to visit one then look no further than the Louvre. It is home to over 30, 000 pieces of art including the wandering eyes of the famous Mona Lisa, the Venus de Milo piece and The Winged Victory.

Situated on the Champs Elysées, the museum is surrounded by a majestic garden area known as the Tuileries, which was added in 1664 by the King of France’s very own personal gardener.

It’s an ideal spot to sit back, relax and soak up the atmosphere if you’ve overloaded on the artwork.

Musee Rodin, Paris

Musee Rodin
Musee Rodin

If after the Louvre you still fancy seeing more museums, then this place has some beautiful sculptures and yet more artwork.

It’s an old mansion dating back to the 18th century and gets its name from a certain Auguste Rodin, who sculpted and created many of the works here from marble and bronze.

Sitting snugly on the Rue de Varenne, you’ll find great works from the famous French artist such as The Thinker, The Hand of God and The Gates of Hell.

Cathedral de Notre Dame

Cathedral de Notre Dame
Cathedral de Notre Dame

This darkly beautiful Gothic Cathedral can be found in the fashionable Latin Quarter.

You’ll be taken aback by the intricacy of the interior and the various artwork, sculptures, and stained glass windows, and if you clamber up the small steps you can ogle at the staring gargoyles and marvel at the thrusting archways.

There’s also a museum, a crypt beneath the main Cathedral and a marker point out the front showing the central spot in Paris.

Champs Elysees

Champs Elysees
Champs Elysees

Champs Elysees is the most renowned and famous avenue in the entire world. From designer shops, restaurants, bars, cinema and theatre, this exclusive area of Paris runs right from Concorde square down to the Arc de Triomphe.

The Champs Elysees dates as far back as the 17th century when the area was nothing more than a little group of fields. In the mid-1600s, a lady known as Marie de Medicis set out a pathway in the area, which was then lined with rows of trees.

This very simple move was the beginning of the avenue. From 1676 more extension of the avenue began to form the “Tuileries” and by 1724 the avenue had extended as far as the Arc de Triomphe.

Footpaths, fountains, lights and additional green areas all contributed to the creation of the Champs Elysees. Along with the metro came bars, restaurants, and theatres, which opened up around the avenue.

Today it’s the most walked and toured the area of Paris.

Arc de Triomphe

Arc de Triomphe
Arc de Triomphe

This the second great landmark in the city of Paris. Placed right at the end of the Champs Elysées, it sits on the intersection of the 12 big avenues in Paris and boasts excellent views across the city from the top.

Beneath the Arch, you’ll find the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier which commemorates those that lost their lives during the Second World War.

Eiffel Tower

Eiffel Tower
Eiffel Tower

The Eiffel Tower has become completely synonymous with Paris and the chances are, if you’re headed for the capital then seeing this symbolic landmark will be somewhere on your agenda.

Originally built during the industrial revolution, as a temporary structure for a fair in the late 1800s, it was once regarded as a blot on the cityscape and was due to be torn down.

Thankfully France eventually came to its senses and decided to retain the magnificent tower. It’s now the most significant sight of the Parisian skyline and an essential visit for any person in Paris.

Be sure to check it out by night – there are sodium bulbs all over the structure which light up to illuminate it brilliantly when the sun goes down.

Basilica du Sacre Coeur

Basilica du Sacre Coeur
Basilica du Sacre Coeur

This well known Cathedral is easily recognized by the three domes that tower above the skyline. Sitting on the highest point in Paris in the charming area of Montmartre.

the Sacré Couer is a curious but beautiful blend of Roman and Byzantium design and a well-liked monument amongst Parisians and tourists alike.

Catacombes

Catacombes
Catacombes

For something spooky and sinister take yourself over to the Catacombes. The underground corridors are full of miles and miles of skeletal bones belong to the poor souls who were buried here way back in the 18th century as a solution to the lack of space in Parisian cemeteries at the time.

Situated on Place Denfert Rochereau, this macabre attraction isn’t for the faint of heart, though it certainly makes for a fascinating trip as you meander your way through the claustrophobic tunnels filled to the brim with skeletons and bones. For a dark and disturbing thrill, you won’t find anything as intense as this!

Palais Bourbon

Palais Bourbon
Palais Bourbon

Located along the Place de la Concorde in Paris, the Palace serves as the seat of the French National Assembly. The palace was built in 1728 and was the Duchess of Bourbon, daughter of Louis XIV’s, palace.

In 1764 the palace was taken over by the Prince of Conde and so much work and sculptures were added to the exterior of the palace between 1803 and 1807.

Today you can visit the library of the palace, which holds historical notes including the minutes of Joan of Arc’s trial, along with Jean Jacques Rousseau’s manuscripts and the Codex Borbonicus.

Hotel de Lassay is connected to Palais Bourbon by a gallery and is the home of the president of the National Assembly.

Palais Royal

Palais Royal
Palais Royal

Formerly the home of Cardinal Richelieu, Palais Royal was built back in 1629. After the death of the Cardinal, King Louis XIV inherited the palace. It was during the French Revolution that Louis-Philippe d’Orleans, Louis cousin, took over the palace.

He then transformed the arcades throughout the palace into cafés and boutiques. Today, Palais Royal is not open to the public, but it’s well worth a visit to see the arcades that today are exclusives cafes and designer boutiques.

Le Grand Vefour is a very well known upmarket restaurant, which is located here. It can boost its fantastic interior décor and exquisite cuisine, however back in the early 1800’s prostitutes and gamblers were often spotted throughout the arcades with a lot of dodgy sales merchants and market banter taking place here also.

Located close to the great boulevards and also Place de l’Opera, evening time may be the best time to go along and view the lighting from the hanging lanterns, the fountains and the fantastic little gardens that surrounds the galleries.

Jardin du Luxembourg

Jardin du Luxembourg
Jardin du Luxembourg

Jardin du Luxembourg is the largest park in the city of Paris. The park is very popular with both visitors and locals alike. Areas of interest in the park include a puppet theatre and the center pond (Grand Bassin) where kids can rent small little boats with remote controls attached.

Chess players are a popular sight also in Jardin du Luxembourg. One of the main features of the park is the two fountains: the Fontaine de Medicis and the Fontaine de l’Observatoire.

All you’ve to do is decide where you want to sit! During milder weather, there are seats supplied by the park. These give you the chance to go and sit wherever you wish.

View the status of past French Queens, sit and view Luxembourg Palace as the gardens completely surround it.

The garden is designed in your typical French style, is located on the left bank of the Seine and close to Luxembourg metro station.

Jardin des Tuileries

Jardin des Tuileries
Jardin des Tuileries

If you’re visiting Paris between June and August, be sure to pay the Jardin des Tuileries a visit. Enjoy the funfair that arrives in the center, where the big wheel gives you the chance to view the surroundings of the city, especially the Rue de Rivoli.

The gardens run from the Louvre to Place de la Concorde. The gardens provide you with the perfect spot to sit back and take a break from it all, not to mention enjoy the fantastic array of flowers and plants.

There are sculptures on display from the 17th through the 21st century many designed by famous artists including Aristide. The park I really popular with kids. They have got a wide choice of activities to do including pony rides, merry-go-rounds and lots more throughout the gardens.

You will find Jardin des Tuileries is close to Tuileries metro station running from Place du Carrousel through to Place de la Concorde, even in the heart of the city, a walk through the refreshing gardens is a must while visiting Paris.

Eurodisney

Eurodisney
Eurodisney

It truly is a magical kingdom. From theme park rides to world-famous rollercoasters, from snapping pictures with Mickey and Minnie mouse to meeting all the Walt Disney characters – it really has it all!

Disneyland Paris is located 30 km outside of Paris. There are direct trains and buses to and from the city to this paradise each day. The park is broken down into five different theme parks; Main Street the USA, Frontierland, Adventureland, Fantasyland, and Discoveryland.

No matter where you venture throughout the park, every corner tells a story. For example in Main Street USA enjoy the re-construction of old town USA with horse-drawn rail cars taking you to Sleeping Beauty’s Castle. In Frontierland, you can recreate scenes from the Wild West.

Adventureland is the place to stop off if you fancy some outrageous and wild rides including Pirates of the Caribbean.

And don’t forget about Fantasyland, the most magical part of the park with themes from so many Disney classics including Snow White and Dumbo – the perfect spot to keep younger children entertained but all the family will just be overwhelmed at this point.

Discoveryland takes you back in time to discover Buzz Lightyear and Space Mountain. Words cannot describe what Disneyland Paris can offer, you just have to go along and experience this for yourself.

Musee d Orsay

Musee d Orsay
Musee d Orsay

Originally one of the city’s largest train stations, the Musee d’Orsay is a fantastic museum, rich in art. Most of the art contained in Musee d’Orsay are collections which date back to the 18th and 19th century.

Located opposite the Jardin du Carrousel, the museum has 3 floors of exhibits. On entering the museum you’ll be hit by the amount of natural light that seeps through the stain glass windows.

Prepare yourself to be impressed! Here you will find impressionist collections of work from Van Gogh, Renoir, Millet and many more. Most of these are located on the upper floor of the museum. On the second floor, you will find a superb Art Noveau collection.

On the top floor make sure you stop off at Musee d’Orsay Café. It’s situated behind one of the giant station clocks, and weather permitting, out on the top of the building you can take in the views of the city overlooking the Seine the views are just breathtaking from up here.

Opera Garnier

Opera Garnier
Opera Garnier

The first thing to look out for as you approach the Opera Garnier, are the four stone statues that are there to greet you. Each one is a symbol for a lyric, a poem, a theatre show, and a dance.

Since the opening of Opera Bastille, Opera Garnier now concentrates mainly on dance. Construction of this beautiful opera house was completed in1875.

While the opera house was being built, a lake was discovered under the building, hence the famous story from the “Phantom of the Opera”. It is said that the Phantom lived in the lake underneath and paid a visit each night to the theatre.

Opera Garnier can seat up to 2,200 people. Ballets are now mainly performed in the opera house. The interior of the building is quite overwhelming. It is, in fact, one of the largest theatres in the world!

The marble staircase along with the eye-catching chandeliers throughout is complimented further by the mosaic-covered ceilings – it’s a spectacular sight. Located on the 9th arrondissement at the Place de l’Opera, you cannot miss a visit to Opera Garnier while visiting Paris.

Pantheon Paris

Pantheon Paris

Located in the Latin Quarter of the city, this amazing building looks out over the city of Paris. The Pantheon was originally built as a church and was completed in 1789.

During the French Revolution, the crypt underneath the Pantheon was used for burial, with Victor Hugo and Voltaire being among some of the most famous people buried here.

Visitors come mainly to view these burial grounds. There are greeted by the plaque that reads “Aux Grands homes la Patrie reconnaissance” (To great men the grateful homeland), at the entrance to the Pantheon.

Another plaque was unveiled in January 2007 by President Jacques Chirac. This plague is a tribute to all the people of France who put their own life at risk to save the majority of the Jewish population that lived in the country during the war and survived being removed back to the concentration camps by the Nazis.

The exterior of the Pantheon looks a lot like the Pantheon in Rome, featuring a dome and because it is on a hill on the Left Bank of the Seine (Montagne Sainte-Genevieve). You’ve got one of the best views of Paris from here.

La Madeleine

La Madeleine, paris
La Madeleine, Paris

This church, which was dedicated to Napoleon and his army for their glory was formerly the church dedicated to St. Mary Magdelene. Located close to the Place de la Concorde each section of the church symbolizes something different.

There loads for you to see here. Check out the exterior’s 52 columns which surround the church and take note of the bronze doors with bas relief’s – these represent the Ten Commandments.

A statue showing the ascension of Mary Magdelene is on view in the church – look out for it just behind the altar. The entire building features sculptures, frescoes, and paintings designed by Renaissance artists, and from the steps at the entrance the views of the Royale and Place de la Concorde are breathtaking.

Located in the 8th arrondissement, lavish wedding masses take place here today. Concerts are also held here as the church boasts its own pipe organ built back in the 19th century and is quite famous throughout the city.